Art Basel | Rezi van Lankveld / Wilfredo Prieto / Sarah van Sonsbeeck

13.06 - 19.06.2022
  • Rezi van Lankveld

  • Rezi van Lankveld, Invisible, 2020

    Rezi Van Lankveld

    Invisible, 2020

    Rezi van Lankveld (1973, Almelo,NL, lives and works in Amsterdam) is known for her small-scale paintings. She harnesses the essential character of paint to create intuitive, complex pictures. Van Lankveld allows paint to flow onto the canvas, making way for unpredicted images. She takes advantage of something sufficiently evocative, a line or a shape, to contribute to the process of building an image; turning that which is perceived into that which is constructed.

  • Rezi van Lankveld | Hollandse Meesters

     

    Rezi van Lankveld for Hollandse Meesters in de 21e eeuw (Dutch masters in the 21st century), a program about the Dutch most important artists of this moment.

    • Rezi van Lankveld, Home, 2022
      Rezi van Lankveld, Home, 2022
    • Rezi van Lankveld, Invisible, 2020
      Rezi van Lankveld, Invisible, 2020
  • Rezi van Lankveld, Absence, 2019

    Drifting Constants

    Absence, 2019

    In 2019, Annet Gelink Gallery presented Rezi van Lankveld's second solo exhibition, titled Drifting Constants. 

     

    These more recent paintings of Rezi van Lankveld are more complex and defined in their form and composition, involving more coloristic elements and using more apparent brushwork. The act of painting is always made instinctively, without any preconceived design, and evolves through constant interaction between spontaneous making and conscious directing of the paint until it becomes transcended into an image. 

     

    In the interplay of what role coincidence and what role intention plays, it is noticeable that Van Lankveld achieves a more balanced point in her later work where the two come together. At the moment of painting, the artist may very well not have premeditated the realization of certain forms. She may simply take advantage of something sufficiently evocative, a line or a shape, to contribute to the process of building an image; turning that which is perceived into that what is constructed.

    • Rezi van Lankveld, Muscles, 2019
      Rezi van Lankveld, Muscles, 2019
    • Rezi van Lankveld, Absence, 2019
      Rezi van Lankveld, Absence, 2019
    • Rezi van Lankveld, Half High, 2019
      Rezi van Lankveld, Half High, 2019
    • Rezi van Lankveld, Cherry, 2019
      Rezi van Lankveld, Cherry, 2019
    • Rezi van Lankveld, Thrillseeker, 2019
      Rezi van Lankveld, Thrillseeker, 2019
    • Rezi van Lankveld, Birthday, 2019
      Rezi van Lankveld, Birthday, 2019
  • Recent solo exhibitions include: Office Baroque, Brussels, Belgium (2020); Reset, Borgloon, Belgium (2019); The Approach, London (2018); Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam (2015); FIAC, Paris (2014); among others. Her work has been included in group exhibitions including Palazzo de’Toschi, Bologna (2020); Annet Gelink, Amsterdam (2019); Root Canal, from De Ateliers, Amsterdam (2018); The Approach, London (2017); Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2016); and many others. Van Lankfeld’s work is included in the collections of the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Centraal Museum, Utrecht; Dordrechts Museum, Dordrecht; The Rabobank Art Collection, The Netherlands; The Art Collection of the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, Chicago, and the Zabludowicz Collection, London and New York. Van Lankveld won the prestigious prize: The Royal Award for Modern Painting (2001).

  • Selected Press

    Frieze

     

    Jurriaan Benschop

     

    Lost Painters

     

    De Groene Amsterdammer

     

     

  • Wilfredo Prieto

  • Wilfredo Prieto, The biggest event of the year, suspended, 2020

    Wilfredo Prieto

    The biggest event of the year, suspended, 2020

    Wilfredo Prieto's (1978, Sancti-Spiritus, Cuba) oeuvre is characterised by extreme minimalism, sarcasm and self-mockery. Ferran Barenblit, director of the CA2M in Madrid, describes Prieto's approach: 'Perhaps one of Wilfredo Prieto's cleverest tactics is his apparent invisibility in the relation between the work of art and the spectator.' In particular that neutral approach, the limited interference of the artist, enables the spectator to interpret his works in their own way. Barenblit: 'As the artist himself regularly says: "Ideas exist in the real world, just like clouds. You can see them and catch them". In a certain way Prieto reminds us of the fact that everyone could have done what he did'. Prieto allows the spectator a range of possibilities, 'a space of unprecedented richness, and this is what makes art a colossal and indispensable human activity.'  (Ferran Barenblit, 'The Straightest Line', in: Wilfredo Prieto. Amarrado A La Pata De La Mesa, 2011).

  • Wilfredo Prieto | Making of Fake News

     

    This video shows Wilfredo prieto at work in La habana creating his #FakeNews painting series. As a daily exercise Prieto reads the news from the national and international press, and interprets this information (or misinformation)through painting, proposing a periodic reflection on fake news and post truths.

  • Wilfredo Prieto, The Great Barrier Reef just experienced stress, 2020

    Fake News

    The Great Barrier Reef just experienced stress, 2020

    During the Covid 19 pandemic, Wilfredo Prieto returned to the medium of painting. As a daily exercise, he read the news from the national and international press and interpreted this information (or misinformation) through painting, proposing a periodic reflection on fake news and post-truths. Through this act, Prieto transmuted the news we see and read daily on digital devices to that most traditional of media, painting. 

    • Wilfredo Prieto, 655 more deaths in one day, 2020
      Wilfredo Prieto, 655 more deaths in one day, 2020
    • Wilfredo Prieto, British girl wins the lottery after losing her job, 2020
      Wilfredo Prieto, British girl wins the lottery after losing her job, 2020
    • Wilfredo Prieto, Increase your size each time, 2020
      Wilfredo Prieto, Increase your size each time, 2020
    • Wilfredo Prieto, Michael's heir, 2020
      Wilfredo Prieto, Michael's heir, 2020
    • Wilfredo Prieto, No action is being taken to stop the pandemic, 2020
      Wilfredo Prieto, No action is being taken to stop the pandemic, 2020
    • Wilfredo Prieto, Olympic photo, 2020
      Wilfredo Prieto, Olympic photo, 2020
    • Wilfredo Prieto, Risk perception, 2020
      Wilfredo Prieto, Risk perception, 2020
    • Wilfredo Prieto, The biggest event of the year, suspended, 2020
      Wilfredo Prieto, The biggest event of the year, suspended, 2020
    • Wilfredo Prieto, The Great Barrier Reef just experienced stress, 2020
      Wilfredo Prieto, The Great Barrier Reef just experienced stress, 2020
    • Wilfredo Prieto, We all depend on each other, 2020
      Wilfredo Prieto, We all depend on each other, 2020
  • Wilfredo Prieto's latest solo exhibitions were held at Fondazione Morra Greco, Naples (2019), Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam (2018 & 2015), Mendes Wood DM Gallery, Sao Paolo (2017), Kurimanzuto, Mexico (2016), Museo de Arte Contemporaneo del Zulia, Maracaibo (2015), Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de La Habana, Havana (2015), S.M.A.K., Gent (2014), NMAC Foundation, Cadiz (2013), Sala de Arte Publico Siqueiros, Mexico (2012), 11th Havana Bienal, J and Calzada, Havana (2012), Praxis, ARTIUM, Vitoria (2011), Kunsthalle Lissabon, Lisbon (2011), Dia Art Foundation, New York (2007). 

     

    His work has been included in numerous group exhibitions, including the Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills (2019), San Jose Museum of Art (2018), Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Rome (2018), Goodman Gallery, Cape Town (2017), the 12th Havana Biennal (2015), Lentos Kunstmuseum Linz, Linz (2014), Centre d`Art la Panera, Lleida (2014), Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (2014), Stedelijk Museum Bureau, Amsterdam (2013), Collateral Event of the 55th Venice Bienal, Venice (2013), Centro de Arte 2 de Mayo (CA2M), Móstoles, Madrid (2011), 29th Sao Paolo Biennial, Sao Paolo (2010), De Appel Arts Centre, Amsterdam (2010), 12th Venice Architecture Biennale (curated by Stefano Rabolli), Venice (2010), CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, San Francisco (2009) and MoMA, New York (2008).

     

    His work is part of the collection of ArtLine Milano, Milan, IT CIFO, Miami, US Colección Cisneros, New Cork, US Col·lecció Cal Cego, Barcelona, ES Collection Museum of Old and New, Tasmania, AU CA2M ,Comunidad de Madrid, ES Daros Collection of Latinamerican Art, Zurich, CH FRAC Corse, France, FR Peter Norton Family Collection, California, US, S.M.A.K., Ghent, BE.

     

    Prieto studied at Instituto Superior de Arte, Havana and has held residencies at Gasworks, London; Le Grand Cafe, St. Nazaire, France; John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, New York and the Kadist Art Foundation, Paris. He received The Cartier Award (Frieze, London, 2008) and the 2000 UNESCO Prize for the Promotion of the Arts (7th Havana Biennial, DUPP, Havana, 2000).

  • Selected Press

    Artforum

     

    ArtReview

     

    Frieze

     

    De Groene Amsterdammer

  • Sarah van Sonsbeeck

  • Sarah van Sonsbeeck

    Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Gold drippings #2.03 (detail), 2021

    Sarah van Sonsbeeck

    Sarah van Sonsbeeck's  (1976, Utrecht, The Netherlands) work is two-sided: on the one hand, she tries to define, defend and extend private space; on the other, she simultaneously reveals the impossibility and perhaps even undesirability of being completely shut off from the world. A case in point is when she tried to contain one cubic meter of silence on the as yet undeveloped plot of land around Museum De Paviljoens in the rapidly developing new town of Almere. One night the reinforced glass cube was smashed with a stone by local youths. She embraced this vandalising act and renamed the work One Cubic Meter of Broken Silence (2009). Instead of preserving the increasingly rare silence - which, strictly speaking, because of the rustling reeds and chirping insects, was no silence at all - the focus of the work shifted to communication (however violent) and interaction. Her work focuses on the thin permeable line between interior and exterior - without concern for the façade. This detour brings her to an investigation of a more immaterial side of architecture, in which she scrutinizes all the small elements that determine how we live in our homes, the things the architects cannot control. She amplifies these elements and devises shields against them, but also welcomes the unpredictable and reveals the minute but intimate relationships between people who don't necessarily know each other. Sarah van Sonsbeeck practises architecture after all, of the immaterial - though no less fundamental - kind.

  • Gold drippings

    Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Gold drippings #2.04 (detail), 2021

    Gold drippings

    The material gold fascinates artist Van Sonsbeeck. Initially focussing on the notion ‘silence’ in her work she got inspired by the saying; ‘speech is silver silence is golden’. By translating the shape of the standard gold bar, Van Sonsbeeck invites us to redefine its value from the commodity of gold to the commodity of art.

    • Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Gold drippings #2.03, 2021
      Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Gold drippings #2.03, 2021
    • Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Gold drippings #2.04, 2021
      Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Gold drippings #2.04, 2021
    • Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Gold drippings #2.02, 2021
      Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Gold drippings #2.02, 2021
    • Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Gold drippings #2.05, 2021
      Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Gold drippings #2.05, 2021
  • Failed ideas

    In the failed idea series Van Sonsbeeck gives new life to the gold waste that was created while gilding other works. She was interested in making something valuable again that was typically waste, hiding her mistakes in plain sight.

    • Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Failed Ideas Rolled and Unrolled #4, 2019
      Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Failed Ideas Rolled and Unrolled #4, 2019
    • Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Failed Ideas Rolled and Unrolled #2, 2019
      Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Failed Ideas Rolled and Unrolled #2, 2019
    • Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Failed Ideas Aeroplane #1, 2019
      Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Failed Ideas Aeroplane #1, 2019
  • Four seasons in one day, 2017

    Oude Kerk, Amsterdam

    In 2016, Sarah van Sonsbeeck spent three weeks on Tristan da Cunha, the most remote island in the world, to research this - in her opinion - extreme acoustic silence, where only 265 people live. On her return trip, she brought back an unusual souvenir: an oxygen bottle. A group of these bottles had once washed up on the island in a lifeboat (where they are needed for survival at sea) belonging to a Petrobras drilling platform, and are used by the islanders as a gong to indicate when one can fish, but also as a warning signal in case of fire. The original is accompanied by two bronze copies, one of raw bronze and one of highly polished bronze, and three hammers to strike the gong with: the artist's hammer, and two bronze copies of it.

    Just as the few residents and Van Sonsbeeck left for Tristan de Cunha, the sound of the gongs travels by sea in eight hours to the islet, 10107 kilometers away from the Old Church.

  • we may have all come on different ships, but we’re in the same boat now, Oude Kerk Amsterdam, 2017

    we may have all come on different ships, but we’re in the same boat now

    Oude Kerk Amsterdam, 2017

    In its early days, the Old Church was a harbor church where ships were blessed, prayers were offered for safe return home, and numerous sailors and maritime heroes found their final resting place.

    What connects the history of the Oude Kerk in Amsterdam with the current issue of migration? This question brought artist Sarah van Sonsbeeck to the interweaving of the Old Church with the sea. In the past, the church was not only one of the few public, covered places where sails and nets could be repaired and sea heroes were buried. The barrel vault was also crafted with ship carpentry techniques as an upside-down hull of a boat.

    In 2012 Van Sonsbeeck made her Anti Drone Tent out of rescue blankets, a material used to keep the body warm and under which one becomes invisible to drones. Current events surrounding refugees have significantly changed the meaning of the golden Mylar blanket. Media images regularly show refugees wrapped in gold, as abstracted forms, after a terrible crossing at sea. It is precisely on this golden, protective material, both ostentatious and wafer-thin, that Van Sonsbeeck wants to reflect in the Old Church, a centuries-old building that originally also provided protection and housing.

  • Sarah van Sonsbeeck studied architecture at TUDelft (MA) and art at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie (BA). In 2008, 2009 she had a residency at the Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunste, Amsterdam. She had solo and groups exhibitons at the Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam (2020, 2017, 2014), Oude Kerk, Amsterdam (2017), De Nederlandsche Bank, Amsterdam (2013), Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven (2012), Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam (2013), Stedelijk Museum, Schiedam (2012) Museum De Paviljoens, Almere (2009), Musem Abteiberg, Mönchengladbach (2011), the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2009).

    Her work is part of the collection of ABN Amro, NL; De Nederlandsche Bank, NL; Rabo Art Collection, NL; ABN Amro, NL ; Museum Abteiberg, Mönchengladbach, DE; Moma, New York, USA; Collection Nicoletta Fiorucci & Milovan Farronato, IT; Collection D. Mignot & Janny Glerum, NL; KB Den Haag, NL; Vandenbroek Foundation, NL; LAM Museum, Lisse, NL; Robeco Collection, NL; ING Collection, NL;AkzoNobel Art Foundation, NL; Schunk Collection, NL; MAK Museum Vienna, AT.

  • Selected Press

    ArtReview

     

    Gallery Viewer

     

    Zone2Source

     

    NRC